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11 German Words for Holy Week and Easter (Karwoche und Ostern)

11 German Words for Easter Holy Week

Christian Holidays are often public holidays in Germany, so these are good words to know whether you're non-religious, atheist, agnostic, or religious.

The schedule carries over into school and school breaks, too. One of my clients is currently on Osterferien, Easter Holidays, and doesn't have school this week or next.

This week is Karwoche, or Holy Week, and in a non-pandemic year there would be much singing of the Bach Passions: the Matthäus-Passion (St. Matthew Passion), the Johannes-Passio…

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What are the Two Most Important Past Tense Verbs in German?

Two Most Important Past Tense Verbs German

When you first learn German - or first start learning German - you say everything in the present tense. You learn only a little bit of the past tense, mainly the two verbs here, and then later you learn the Perfekt, or the spoken past tense (Ich bin gefahren. Wir haben ein Buch gelesen.).

This is the order you would ideally learn everything in:

Present tense --> these two verbs --> a bunch of the Perfekt

If you learn the past tense in any other order than that, it is out of order.

No excepti…

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How to Use Separable Verbs in German

How to use separable verbs in German

Separable verbs are not hard to understand, however learning to use them takes practice and time.


For the purposes of this first section, we'll use two separable verbs in the present tense – so we'll use them to talk about now.


Right now.


A separable verb (in German: ein trennbares Verb, plural: trennbare Verben) is a verb that requires you to do three things :

  1. remove the prefix from the verb

  2. conjugate what's left

  3. tack the prefix on to the end of the sentence.

That's…

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What's the Difference Between "Verkehr" and "Stau"?

What's the Difference Between _Verkehr_ and _Stau__

When you're at the A1 level, "Verkehr" and "Stau" can be tough to differentiate. Most people say "It has something to do with cars!!" If you said that, you're correct! But what's the difference?

The difference is essentially the same as in English, but one use of "Verkehr" might trip you up.

Read on to learn the difference and how not to get tripped up by the one use of "Verkehr"!

Whats the Difference Between Verkehr Stau.png

 

volkswagen beetle mdWas bedeutet "Verkehr"?

 Verkehr is simply the word for traffic. You can have multiple types of Verkehr:

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"wohin" vs. "woher"

wohin vs woher which one to use when

If you learned German in college, chances are you learned both “woher” and “wohin” at the same time.

Do you ever drive in reverse and forwards at the same time?

I didn't think so.

Why so many US textbook authors think this is a good idea is beyond me.

In drivers education, first you learn to drive forwards, you get a feel for the car, and then you learn to drive in reverse.

It's not that hard, textbook authors!

 

*Nicole facepalms and sighs with exasperation.*

 

That's a really good way…

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4 Reasons Minimalists Should Learn German (And Why German is Easier than English!)

4 Reasons Minimalists Should Learn German

If you are already living with less or a minimum amount of possessions, or would like to, this philosophy works in your favor when learning German. Experience a language which is significantly more predictable than English; German is a great language to explore!

You'll also discover here how, in many ways, German is actually easier than English. I say this as a native English speaker, a near-native German speaker, and an instructor for both languages.

Of course both languages have their own un…

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5 Easy Books for A1 (Beginning) German Learners

5 Easy Books for Beginning German Learners

And how to get the most out of each book!

If you are an A1 German learner, then that means you are at the beginning level of German. You're a beginner. It stays that way for a while.

The A1 level is key for you because it gives you the basics of German grammar. A1 is the foundational level for all other levels. I frequently tell people

Think of the A1 level like the foundation of your house. You can't build a house on sand. So if you don't have a good foundation, you're going to have a lot …

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How to Live Like a German

How to Live Like a German

and make German a part of your everyday life.

Sometimes it amazes me how quickly people can pick up German words and sentence structure, even though they've never been to Germany and haven't learned German before.

Clients come to a lesson and they have no idea what German bread tastes like, but they can talk about German breakfast: das Brot, die Marmelade, der Kaffee.

It can be a source of frustration, however, to learn German, but only to have all these North American elements around us:  sp…

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Quick Guide to the »W-Fragen«

W-Fragen Printable

The W-Fragen are questions that begin with the question words--in English:  who, what, when, where, why, and how. To contrast, yes/no questions in German begin with the verb ("Arbeiten Sie heute?" "Kommen Sie aus Bayern?").

In most books you usually see a list like this, it's just the German and English translations. But is that really enough? Take a close look.

German   English
was  what
wann  when
wo  where
wie  how
warum  why
wer  who

 

If…

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Sagt man "Viel Glück" oder "Viel Erfolg"?

Viel Glück oder viel Erfolg

Wishing someone "good luck" in German often goes one of two ways--either "Viel Glück!" or "Viel Erfolg!" Which one you use depends on what you want to say.

viel Glück oder viel Erfolg.png

If you'd like to wish some one "good luck," then go with "Viel Glück!" It really is like wishing them luck--because you're unsure how the result may turn out.

However, just like in English, it's also possible to say, sarcastically, "Good luck with that!" Then you also use "Viel Glück!" and if you want to add extra emphasis to the fact tha…

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