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Grammatik

Lernen Sie trennbare Verben Learn separable verbs

trennbare Verben lernen learn separable verbs

Today you get to learn separable verbs (trennbare Verben) just like one of my German clients!

This is a technique I've used with dozens of German learners and it makes separable verbs a kinaesthetic exercise--and that in two different ways.

You'll need to do one thing and to get one supply to have ready when you start the video.

Free German Lesson Separable Verbs.png

Step 1

Download this PDF of 4x6 cards and print them, or simply use them to make your own cards if you can't print them. You can also use small cards or slips of p…

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9 Easy Back-to-School Gifts for German Learners

9 Easy Back-to-School Gifts for German Learners

Do you need a German back-to-school gift?

If you're not sure what to give your favorite German learner, here are 9 fantastic ideas, all available from Amazon.com.

The links below are affiliate links. They are marked with an (A), which means that if you click through that picture/link and make a purchase, I'll receive a small amount of that purchase as a thank-you.

More than anything, I want you to buy the best back-to-school gift possible for your favorite German student!

Los geht's!

Für al…

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"wohin" vs. "woher"

wohin vs woher which one to use when

If you learned German in college, chances are you learned both “woher” and “wohin” at the same time.

Do you ever drive in reverse and forwards at the same time?

I didn't think so.

Why so many US textbook authors think this is a good idea is beyond me.

In drivers education, first you learn to drive forwards, you get a feel for the car, and then you learn to drive in reverse.

It's not that hard, textbook authors!

 

*Nicole facepalms and sighs with exasperation.*

 

That's a really good way…

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"zu" vs. "nach"

zu vs nach which one to use when

"Zu..." no. "Nach..."

Wait! Which one do I use? GAH!

Have you said that before? I bet you have, as I’ve heard it from every beginning German learner I’ve worked with. And a lot of intermediate level speakers, too.

The difference is: with “zu” and “nach,” size makes a difference. But not how you might think.

 When do I use “zu”?

“Zu” is used for places like

  • die Bäckerei
  • die Post
  • your friend Michael’s house
  • die Arbeit
  • die Bushaltestelle

These are, in fact, all smaller places. A …

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4 Reasons Minimalists Should Learn German (And Why German is Easier than English!)

4 Reasons Minimalists Should Learn German

If you are already living with less or a minimum amount of possessions, or would like to, this philosophy works in your favor when learning German. Experience a language which is significantly more predictable than English; German is a great language to explore!

You'll also discover here how, in many ways, German is actually easier than English. I say this as a native English speaker, a near-native German speaker, and an instructor for both languages.

Of course both languages have their own un…

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Sorry, There is no Oxford Comma in German.

Sorry There is no Oxford Comma in German

Discussions begin, lawyers are called, and lawsuits are filed. All of it is about a comma. (See what I did there?)

The Oxford comma is so important to people that spouses actually have discussions about it. They've talked about everything like where to live, how to manage their finances, and how many kids to have, but years later they find out only one of them uses the Oxford comma. [Cut dramatic music.] It's like now the real stuff of marriage has come to the forefront:

to use the Oxford comm…

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5 Reasons Why You Still Can't Speak German

5 Reasons Why You Still Can't Speak German
Frustration can run pretty high when you take a German class but you just can’t seem to speak it correctly. The baker in Germany doesn’t understand you so you have to point and the person you ask for directions switches to English. Maybe you realize in a press conference that you can't speak German. Yikes!
 
So why is it that you have taken class after class or lesson after lesson, but you still can’t speak German? There might be more than one reason, and here are five that are common themes a…

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21 Christmas Gifts for German Students - listed by learning level!

21 Christmas Gifts for German Students

When you're buying a Christmas gift for someone who is studying German, you may not know exactly what they need. With one small piece of information, that is which level of German they are at, you can do some quality gift buying right here.

Be sneaky! Look on your German learner's book for one of these combinations: A1, A2, B1, B2, or C1. There might be a "+" after it or the book might show a range of levels, for example A2-B1. Sometimes the letter/number combination is on a blue square with th…

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Viel oder viele?

viel oder viele

"Viel" oder "Viele"? Gute Frage!

viel oder viele.png

It depends on whether or not you're speaking about something that can be counted. For example:

viel Zeit - lots of time. Time in general cannot be counted. (You can count hours, but not time itself.)

viele Menschen - many people. People can be counted.

Erfolg (success) is another example of something that cannot be counted. Certain things, yes, like finishing a degree or obtaining your driver's license, can be counted, sure, however they are very specific e…

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"zu Hause" vs. "nach Hause"

zu Hause vs nach Hause

The difference between "zu Hause" vs. "nach Hause" easily trips up German learners, but it doesn't have to trip you up if you use the tips below.

1. "zu Hause" = (at) home

"zu" is usually used as a preposition, so it would stand by itself and you might think that "zu Hause" means "to home." This is an exception. When you say "zu Hause," you're really using it as one block of language.

Think of the sentence "Ich bin zu Hause" and picture it like two wooden blocks:

[Ich]    [bin]    [zu Hause…

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